Lower-Division General Education

For an overview of the SF State General Education program, visit our Introduction to General Education.

Please note that although General Education courses are available to students in any major, registration in some sections of specific courses may be restricted to students in the Metro Academies.

Some students come to SF State with high enough AP, CLEP, and IB scores to receive college credit. Go to the following link to see what GE requirements are satisfied by these scores. Consult with your major department to see whether any of the credit can count toward your major.

AP – IB – CLEP Test Credit

Students Entering SF State Prior to Fall 2014

Continuing students who were enrolled at SF State prior to fall 2014 follow the General Education program that was in effect when they came to SF State, with a few modifications. Please visit the Division of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning for more information about your General Education requirements and approved courses. 

Freshman Students

Students who begin at SF State as first-time college students in fall 2014 or later, must complete General Education as outlined below. 

Transfer Students

Transfer students who begin at SF State in fall 2014 or later may complete the 39 units of lower-division General Education (GE) requirements (Area A–E), as well as lower-division requirements in a major, minor, or certificate program at another campus if those units have been approved through an articulation agreement or an approved evaluation process. Regardless of the number of units a student took to fulfill General Education requirements at other schools, to graduate they must complete a total of 39 units of lower-division General Education plus 9 units of upper-division GE coursework. Any lower-division GE coursework not taken in transfer must be taken at SF State from the list of courses below.

  • Transfer students who have completed Area D but who have not completed the US History and Government requirements must do so at SF State (Refer to US History and Government Requirement).
  • Transfer students who complete the US History and Government requirements without completing 9 units in Area D must take additional Area D courses to total 9 units.
  • Transfer students must complete 9 units of lower-division Area C coursework with at least one Area C1 and one Area C2 course.
  • Transfer students must complete SF State Studies requirements. Most, if not all, of these requirements will be completed while satisfying the Upper-Division GE requirements. Students transferring with a verified ADT (AA-T or AS-T degree) who are pursuing a “similar” major do not have to complete the SF State Studies requirements. Visit our Transfer Students page for more information about procedures and guidelines regarding the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT).

Area A: English Language Communication and Critical Thinking — 9 units

Students taking courses in fulfillment of Areas A1 and A2 will develop knowledge and understanding of the form, content, context, and effectiveness of communication. Students will develop proficiency in oral and written communication in English, examining communication from the rhetorical perspective and practicing reasoning and advocacy, organization, and accuracy. Students will practice the discovery, critical evaluation, and reporting of information, as well as reading, writing, and listening effectively.

In critical thinking (Area A3) courses, students will understand logic and its relation to language; elementary inductive and deductive processes, including an understanding of the formal and informal fallacies of language and thought; and the ability to distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion. In Area A3 courses, students will develop the abilities to analyze, criticize, and advocate ideas; to reason inductively and deductively; and to reach well-supported factual or judgmental conclusions.

Requirements: Students who start as freshmen must complete a minimum of nine units in Area A, including a minimum of three units in each of the following three areas: Oral Communication, Written English Communication, and Critical Thinking. Specific test and course prerequisites are printed in the Undergraduate Graduation Requirements section of the Bulletin. Beginning in Fall 2014, all Area A courses must be completed with a grade of CR or C– or better to fulfill the General Education requirement.

Area A1: Oral Communication (3 units required)

AA S 101First-Year Experience (A1, AERM)3
AFRS 120Communicating Realness: Minding the Gap (A1, AERM)3
COMM 150Fundamentals of Oral Communication (A1)3
ENG 210Oral Communication - Multilingual (A1)3

Area A2: Written English Communication (3 units minimum required)

ENG 104
ENG 105
Writing the First Year: Finding Your Voice Stretch I
and Writing the First Year: Finding Your Voice Stretch II (A2)
6
ENG 114Writing the First Year: Finding Your Voice (A2)3
ENG 201
ENG 202
Writing the First Year: Global Perspectives of Multilingual Speakers Stretch I
and Writing the First Year: Global Perspectives of Multilingual Speakers Stretch II (A2)
8
ENG 209Writing the First Year: Global Perspectives of Multilingual Speakers (A2)3

Area A3: Critical Thinking (3 units required)

AA S 110Critical Thinking and the Asian American Experience (A3, AERM)3
COUN 110Critically Thinking About Career Choice: Self, Community, Society, and the World (A3, GP, SJ)3
ETHS 110Critical Thinking and the Ethnic Studies Experience (A3, AERM)3
HIST 101Critical Thinking in History (A3, SJ)3
HSS 110Critical Thinking/Student Success in Health & Social Sciences Fields (A3)3
LTNS 110Critical Thinking in Latina/o Studies (A3, AERM, SJ)3
PHIL 110Introduction to Critical Thinking I (A3)3
PSY 111The Logic and Psychology of Critical Thinking (A3)3
RPT 110Critical Thinking and the Leisure Experience (A3)3
RRS 110Critical Thinking and the Ethnic Studies Experience (A3, AERM)3

Abbreviations

AERM: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities
ES: Environmental Sustainability
GP: Global Perspectives
SJ: Social Justice

Area B: Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning — 9 units

In Areas B1–B3, students develop knowledge of scientific theories, concepts, and data about both living and non-living systems. Students will achieve an understanding and appreciation of scientific principles and the scientific method, as well as the potential limits of scientific endeavors and the value systems and ethics associated with human inquiry.

In Area B4 courses, students shall develop skills and understanding beyond the level of intermediate algebra. Students will not just practice computational skills, but will be able to explain and apply basic mathematical concepts and will be able to solve problems through quantitative reasoning.

Requirements: All students must complete a minimum of nine units in Area B including a minimum of three units in each of the following three areas: Physical Science, Life Science, and Quantitative Reasoning. Additionally, a course that satisfies the Laboratory Science requirement must also be taken.

Specific test and course prerequisites are printed in the Undergraduate Graduation Requirements section of the Bulletin.

Note: Some majors require advanced coursework in Areas B1, B2, and/or B3. For students pursuing these majors, some Area B requirements will be met in major or pre-major coursework. For more information, students should refer to the Bulletin description for their major.

Area B1: Physical Science (3 units minimum required)

ADM 260Textiles (B1)3
ASTR 115Introduction to Astronomy (B1)3
CHEM 101Survey of Chemistry (B1)3
CHEM 180Chemistry for the Energy and the Environment (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 110Our Dynamic Earth (B1, ES)3
ERTH 112Our Dynamic Earth Lecture and Lab (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 160Our Dynamic Weather (B1, GP)3
ERTH 162Our Dynamic Weather Lecture and Lab (B1, B3)3
ERTH 170Our Dynamic Ocean (B1, ES)3
ERTH 172Our Dynamic Ocean Lecture and Lab (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 210Physical Geology (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 230Environmental Geology (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 240Environmental Water Resources (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 260Physical Processes in the Atmosphere (B1, B3, ES, GP)4
GEOG 101Our Physical Environment (B1, ES)3
PHYS 101Conceptual Physics (B1)3
PHYS 111General Physics I (B1)3
PHYS 220General Physics with Calculus I (B1)3

Area B2: Life Science (3 units required)

ANTH 100Introduction to Biological Anthropology (B2)3
BIOL 100Human Biology (B2, SJ)3
BIOL 150The World of Plants (B2, B3, ES)3
BIOL 160Marine Biology (B2, ES)3
BIOL 170Animal Diversity (B2, ES)3
BIOL 176Science and Politics of Stem Cell Biology (B2, AERM, SJ)3
ERTH 115History of Life (B2, ES)3
GEOG 160Introduction to Environmental Science (B2, B3, ES, GP)4
LTNS 210Latina/Latino Health Care Perspectives (B2, AERM, ES, GP, SJ)3
RRS 276Race, Activism and Climate Justice (B2, AERM, ES, GP, SJ)3

Area B3: Laboratory Science (0–1 units required)

ASTR 116Astronomy Laboratory (B3)1
BIOL 101Human Biology Laboratory (B3)1
BIOL 150The World of Plants (B2, B3, ES)3
CHEM 102Survey of Chemistry Laboratory (B3)1
CHEM 180Chemistry for the Energy and the Environment (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 111Our Dynamic Earth Lab (B3)1
ERTH 112Our Dynamic Earth Lecture and Lab (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 162Our Dynamic Weather Lecture and Lab (B1, B3)3
ERTH 171Our Dynamic Ocean Lab (B3)1
ERTH 172Our Dynamic Ocean Lecture and Lab (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 210Physical Geology (B1, B3, ES)4
ERTH 230Environmental Geology (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 240Environmental Water Resources (B1, B3, ES)3
ERTH 260Physical Processes in the Atmosphere (B1, B3, ES, GP)4
GEOG 160Introduction to Environmental Science (B2, B3, ES, GP)4
LS 209Physical Sciences for Elementary School Teachers (B3)3
PHYS 102Conceptual Physics Laboratory (B3)1
PHYS 112General Physics I Laboratory (B3)1
PHYS 222General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory (B3)1

Area B4: Quantitative Reasoning (3 units required)

Details on test and course prerequisites are listed in the Undergraduate Graduation Requirements section of the Bulletin.

Summary of Quantitative Reasoning Requirements

The B4 course or pathway that needs to be followed depends on a student’s MATH/QR placement category or ELM/Remediation status.  See the holds and alerts box in the student center for more information.

  1. Students who have been placed in enrollment category I for Fall 18 and later admission have satisfied the B4 requirement for general education.  Please check the requirements for your intended major to verify if a specific math course is required for that major and to confirm whether or not you need to take a math course for your major.
  2. Students who have satisfied the ELM requirement or passed Math 70 or ESM 70 with a C or better (prior to Fall 18 admission) or who have been placed in category II for Math/QR placement (Fall 18 and later admission) are eligible to take a B4 course.  Please check the requirements for your intended major to verify if a math course is required for your major and plan to take that course to satisfy both the B4 and major requirements.
  3. Students who have not satisfied the ELM requirement or not passed Math 70 or ESM 70 with a C or better (prior to Fall 18 admission) or who have been placed in category III or IV for Math/QR placement (Fall 18 and later admission) must take a B4 course with additional support.  Category IV students are also required to complete early start.  Please check the requirements for your intended major to verify if a math course is required for your major.  Check the table below for information about the additional support needed for that course.

Beginning in Fall 2014, Area B4 courses must be completed with a grade of CR or C– or better to fulfill the General Education requirement.

B4 Pathways
B4 Courses for Pathway/Category 2 or ELM; MATH 70 or ESM 70 met B4 courses with additional support for Pathway/Category 3 and 4 or ELM; MATH 70 or ESM 70 not met
DS 110 Calculus with Business Applications (B4) 3 units MATH 107 (3 units) and MATH 108* (3 units) across two semesters. MATH 107 and 108 will satisfy all requirements met by DS 110.
CSC 110 Computational Thinking and Quantitative Reasoning (B4) 3 units MATH 112 (2 units) and CSC 110 concurrently
ISED 160 Data Analysis in Education (B4) 3 units MATH 122 (2 units) and ISED 160 concurrently
MATH 110 Business Calculus (B4) 3 units MATH 107 (3 units) and MATH 108* (3 units) across two consecutive semesters. MATH 107 and MATH 108 will satisfy all requirements met by MATH 110.
MATH 124 Elementary Statistics (B4) 3 units MATH 123 (2 units) and MATH 124 concurrently
MATH 199 Pre-Calculus (B4) 4 units MATH 197 (3 units) and MATH 198* (3 units) across two consecutive semesters. MATH 197 and MATH 198 will satisfy all requirements met by MATH 199.
PHIL 111 The Art(s) of Quantitative Reasoning (B4) 3 units MATH 112 (2 units) and PHIL 111 concurrently
PSY 171 Quantitative Reasoning in Psychology (B4) 3 units MATH 122 (2 units) and PSY 171 concurrently
Other B4 Courses 
ETHS 116Algebra and Statistics for Social Justice (B4, SJ)4
ETHS 117Statistics for Social Justice (B4, SJ)3
GEOG 203Geographical Measurement (B4)3
HIST 112Quantitative Reasoning for Civic Engagement (B4, SJ)3
LCA 112Quantitative Reasoning for Civic Engagement (B4, SJ)3
MATH 108Mathematics for Business Calculus II (B4)3
MATH 198Prelude to Calculus II (B4)3
MATH 226Calculus I (B4)4
PHIL 112Quantitative Reasoning for Civic Engagement (B4, SJ)3
PLSI 112Quantitative Reasoning for Civic Engagement (B4, SJ)3

Abbreviations

AERM: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities
ES: Environmental Sustainability
GP: Global Perspectives
SJ: Social Justice

Area C: Arts and Humanities — 9 units

In their Area C coursework, students will develop a better understanding of the interrelationship between the self and the creative arts and of the humanities in a variety of cultures.

Requirements: Students starting as freshmen or transfers at SF State must complete a minimum of nine units in Area C including three units in Arts (C1), three units in Humanities (C2), and three units from either Arts (C1) or Humanities (C2).

Area C1: Arts

AA S 212Asian Americans and Mass Media (C1, AERM)3
AFRS 204Black Creative Arts (C1, AERM, GP, SJ)3
AFRS 221African American Music: A 20th Century Survey (C1, AERM)3
AFRS 230African American Gospel Workshop (C1, AERM)3
AFRS 256Hip Hop Workshop (C1, AERM, ES, GP, SJ)3
AIS 235American Indians: Image and Issues in the Mass Media (C1, AERM, SJ)3
ART 235Introduction to Printmaking (C1)3
ART 240Introduction to Contemporary Sculpture (C1)3
ART 245Introduction to Ceramics (C1)3
ARTH 201Western Art History I (C1)3
ARTH 202Western Art History II (C1)3
ARTH 205Asian Art History (C1, GP)3
BECA 235Digital Media Basics (C1)3
C W 101Introduction to Creative Writing (C1)3
CINE 102Introduction to Contemporary Cinema (C1, GP)3
CLAR 250Archaeology of the Ancient World (C1, GP)3
DES 226Modern Letterpress Printing: Traditional and Digital Techniques (C1)3
DES 256Design and Society: Contemporary Design Issues and Applications (C1)3
HUM 205Asian Art History (C1, GP)3
ID 240Color and Design (C1)3
ID 245Contemporary Design in Housing and Interiors (C1)3
JOUR 235Photojournalism I (C1)3
LTNS 225Survey of Latina/o Visual Images (C1, AERM, SJ)3
M S 202Introduction to Museum Exhibits (C1)3
MUS 120Basic Music I (C1)3
MUS 122Basic Music I: Piano (C1)3
MUS 132Appreciation of Diverse Music (C1)3
MUS 280Traditions and Current Practices of Music and Sound for Healing (C1, GP)3
MUS 281The American Musical Experience (C1, AERM, GP)3
PH 290Promoting Positive Health (C1, GP)3
PHIL 160Introduction to Philosophy of the Arts (C1)3
RPT 210Growth Through Art and Leisure (C1)3
RRS 290Sounds of Resistance: Race, Rhythm, Rhyme, and Revolution (C1, AERM, GP)3
TH A 122Basic Music I: Piano (C1)3
TH A 130Acting Workshop I (C1)3
TH A 200Introduction to the Theatre (C1)3

Area C2: Humanities

AA S 216Introduction to Asian American Literature (C2, AERM)3
AA S 218Asian American Culture (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
ANTH 110Introduction to Archaeology (C2, GP)3
AFRS 201Kemet, Afrocentricity, and the Dawn of Science (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
AFRS 210Introduction to Africana Literature (C2, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 266Black Online: Cyberspace, Culture, and Community (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
ARAB 101First Semester Arabic (C2, AERM, GP)4
ARAB 102Second Semester Arabic (C2, GP)4
ARAB 103Third Semester Arabic (C2, GP)4
ARAB 104Fourth Semester Arabic (C2, GP)4
ARAB 206Intermediate Conversation (C2, GP)3
ARAB 260Arab Culture and Identity in English (C2, GP)3
BECA 201Life on TV: A Critical View (C2, AERM)3
CAD 120Child Development, Social Justice, and Academic Success (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
CHIN 101First Semester Chinese (C2, GP, SJ)4
CHIN 102Second Semester Chinese (C2, GP, SJ)4
CHIN 103Third Semester Chinese (C2, GP, SJ)4
CHIN 111Accelerated Elementary Chinese I (C2, GP, SJ)4
CHIN 228Chinese Language and Society (C2, GP)3
CHIN 271The Classic Chinese Novel in Contemporary Pop Culture (C2, GP, SJ)3
CINE 180The Ancient World in Film (C2)3
CLAS 210Introduction to Greek and Roman Literature (C2)3
CLAS 230Ancient Epic Tales (C2)3
CLAS 240Greek and Roman Drama (C2, SJ)3
CLAS 260Greek and Roman Mythology (C2, GP)3
CLAS 280The Ancient World in Film (C2)3
COMM 120Language, Culture, and Power (C2, AERM, SJ)3
COMM 250Introduction to Group Discussion and Teamwork (C2)3
CWL 220Reading Beyond Boundaries: An Introduction to Comparing Literatures (C2, GP)3
CWL 230World Literature (C2, GP)3
CWL 250Fables and Tales (C2, GP)3
CWL 260Myths of the World (C2, GP)3
CWL 270Fantasy and Fiction: Exploring Parallel Worlds (C2)3
ENG 200Writing Practices in Professional Contexts (C2)3
ENG 250Topics in Literature and Culture (C2)3
ETHS 120Educational Justice, Health Equity, and Academic Success (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
FR 101First Semester French (C2, GP, SJ)4
FR 102Second Semester French (C2, GP, SJ)4
FR 215Intermediate French I (C2, GP, SJ)3
FR 216Intermediate French II (C2, GP, SJ)3
GER 101First Semester German (C2, GP)4
GER 206Intermediate German Conversation (C2, GP)3
GER 207Intermediate German (C2, GP)3
GRE 101Elementary Ancient Greek (C2, GP)4
GRE 202Intermediate Ancient Greek (C2, GP)4
HEBR 101First Semester Modern Hebrew (C2, GP)3
HEBR 102Second Semester Modern Hebrew (C2, GP)3
HEBR 201Third Semester Modern Hebrew (C2, GP)3
HEBR 202Fourth Semester Modern Hebrew (C2, GP)3
HH 210The Dao of Well-Being in Chinese Tradition (C2, AERM)3
HIST 110History of Western Civilization I (C2, GP)3
HIST 111History of Western Civilization II (C2, GP)3
HUM 130The Humanities: Major Works (C2)3
HUM 220Values and Culture (C2, GP)3
HUM 225Values in American Life (C2, AERM)3
HUM 271The Classic Chinese Novel in Contemporary Pop Culture (C2, GP, SJ)3
ITAL 100First Semester Italian for Speakers of English and Spanish (C2, GP)4
ITAL 101First Semester Italian (C2, GP)4
ITAL 102Second Semester Italian (C2, GP)4
ITAL 103Third Semester Italian (C2, GP)3
ITAL 104Fourth Semester Italian (C2, GP)3
ITAL 206Italian Conversation (C2, GP, SJ)3
ITAL 250Food for Thought: The Importance of Food in Italian Culture (C2, GP)3
JAPN 101First Semester Japanese (C2, GP)4
JAPN 102Second Semester Japanese (C2, GP)4
JAPN 103Third Semester Japanese (C2, GP)4
JOUR 205Social Impact of Journalism (C2)3
JS 280Introduction to Jewish Studies (C2)3
KOR 101First Semester Korean (C2, GP)4
KOR 102Second Semester Korean (C2, GP)4
LATN 101Elementary Latin (C2, GP)4
LTNS 230Introduction to Latina/o Literature (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
MEIS 260Turkish Cultures and Identities (C2, GP)3
MEIS 290Introduction to Turkish Literature in Translation (C2, GP)3
MGS 150Modern Greek I (C2, GP)4
MUS 134Survey of Music for Film, TV, and Games (C2)3
PH 120Educational Justice, Health Equity, and Academic Success (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
PHIL 101Introduction to Philosophy (C2)3
PHIL 105Introduction to Philosophy and Religion (C2)3
PHIL 150Contemporary Moral/Political Issues (C2, SJ)3
PHIL 210Great Thinkers: East and West (C2, GP)3
PLSI 150Contemporary Moral/Political Issues (C2, SJ)3
PRSN 100Persian Language Immersion (C2, GP, SJ)3
PRSN 101First Semester Persian (C2, GP, SJ)4
PRSN 102Second Semester Persian (C2, GP, SJ)4
PRSN 103Third Semester Persian (C2, GP, SJ)4
PRSN 206Basic Persian Conversation (C2, GP, SJ)3
PRSN 250Intermediate Persian (C2, GP, SJ)3
PRSN 260Persian Culture and Civilization in English (C2, GP, SJ)3
PRSN 290Introduction to Persian Literature in Translation (C2, GP, SJ)3
RPT 230Growth Through Adventure (C2)3
RRS 101Introduction to Arab and Muslim Communities (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
RRS 201SFSU's Palestinian Cultural Mural and the Art of Resistance (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
RRS 212Edward Said (C2, AERM, GP, SJ)3
RRS 280Race, Gender, and Science Fiction (C2, AERM)3
RUSS 101First Semester Russian (C2, GP)4
RUSS 102Second Semester Russian (C2, GP)4
RUSS 103Third Semester Russian (C2, GP)4
SPAN 101First Semester Spanish (C2)4
SPAN 102Second Semester Spanish (C2)4

Abbreviations

AERM: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities
ES: Environmental Sustainability
GP: Global Perspectives
SJ: Social Justice

Transfer Students

Area D: Social Sciences — 9 units

Nine semester lower-division units (8 quarter units) and 3 additional semester units (4 quarter units) at the upper-division. Courses shall be completed in at least 2 different disciplines among the 9 required semester units (or 12 required quarter units). Six lower-division units for transfer students starting fall 2022.

Area D requires units dealing with human social, political and economic institutions and behavior, and their historical background. Courses shall be completed from at least two different disciplines among the lower-division and upper-division required semester units.

Students learn from courses in multiple Area D disciplines that human social, political and economic institutions and behavior are inextricably interwoven. Through fulfillment of the Area D requirement, students will develop an understanding of problems and issues from the respective disciplinary perspectives and will examine issues in their contemporary as well as historical settings and in a variety of cultural contexts. Students will explore the principles, methodologies, value systems and ethics employed in social scientific inquiry. Courses that emphasize skills development and professional preparation are excluded from Area D.

First-Time Freshmen

Area D: Social Sciences & American Institutions

Through fulfillment of the Area D & American Institutions requirements, students will develop an understanding of problems and issues from a social science perspective and will examine issues in their contemporary as well as historical settings and a variety of cultural contexts. Students will explore the principles, methodologies, value systems, and ethics employed in social scientific inquiry.

The CSU Title 5 American Institutions/US History and Government requirements may all met by examination (AP or CLEP) or by the courses listed below.

In U.S. History courses, students will learn about the relationships among regions within the area of study and with external regions and states and the role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred.

In U.S. and California Government courses, students will learn about the political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of United States political institutions and processes. Students will also learn about California government, particularly the Constitution of the State of California within the framework of the evolution of Federal-State relations and the nature and processes of State and local government under that Constitution.

Social Sciences

AA S 211Contemporary Asian Americans (D, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 101Introduction to Africana Studies (D, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 111Black Cultures and Personalities (D, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 200Introduction to Black Psychology (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
AFRS 202Black Men's Studies (D, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 203Black Social Sciences (D, AERM, SJ)3
AFRS 215Introduction to Black Family Studies (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
AFRS 260Power, Racism, and Africana Liberation (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
AIS 160Survey of Native California (D, AERM, ES, SJ)3
AIS 230Urban Indians (D, AERM, SJ)3
ANTH 120Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (D, SJ)3
ANTH 130Introduction to Visual Anthropology (D)3
C J 230Crime, Data, and Analysis (D)3
CAD 210Introduction to Applied Child and Adolescent Development (D)3
CAD 260Children, Families, and Community: An Ecological Perspective (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
COMM 240Introduction to Nonverbal Communication (D)3
ECON 101Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis (D)3
ECON 102Introduction to Macroeconomic Analysis (D)3
ETHS 100Introduction to Ethnic Studies (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
ETHS 221Health and Social Justice - Burning Issues, Taking Action (D, AERM, SJ)3
ENG 122The Evolution of Language in the Digital Age (D)3
FCS 220Young Children and Families (D)3
FIN 101Personal Finance (D)3
GEOG 102The Human Environment (D, ES, GP)3
GEOG 107World Regions and Interrelations (D, ES, GP)3
HH 200Holistic Approach to Academic Success (D, ES)3
HH 205Relaxation and Stress Reduction (D)3
HIST 114World History to 1500 (D, GP)3
HIST 115World History Since 1500 (D, GP)3
I R 104Introduction to International Relations: Politics, Economics, Environment, and People (D, ES, GP, SJ)3
IBUS 130Globalization and Business in the 21st Century (D, GP)3
KIN 255Health-Related Fitness and Wellness (D, ES, GP, SJ)3
LABR 250Introduction to the Study of Labor (D, GP)3
LABR 251Know Your Work Rights (D, SJ)3
LTNS 211Latina/o Families Narrative (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
LTNS 265Topics in Latina/o History (D, AERM, SJ)3
PH 200Global Health (D, GP, SJ)3
PH 210Personal and Social Determinants of Health (D, SJ)3
PH 221Health and Social Justice - Burning Issues, Taking Action (D, AERM, SJ)3
PHIL 130Political and Social Philosophy (D, AERM, SJ)3
PLSI 100Understanding Politics (D, SJ)3
PLSI 106Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy: Introduction to Political Economy (D, SJ)3
PSY 200General Psychology (D)3
RPT 200Foundations of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (D)3
RPT 205Adventure Travel (D)3
RPT 240Leisure and Society (D)3
RPT 280Developmental Play Processes (D)3
RRS 100Introduction to Ethnic Studies (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
RRS 255Voices in Exile: Arab and Muslim American and Civil Liberties post-9/11/2001 (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
RRS 285Race, Sports, and Society (D, AERM)3
S ED 200Introduction to Teaching and Education (D)3
SOC 105Sociological Perspectives (D)3
SOC 110Sexuality in Society (D, SJ)3
SOC 200Changing Cities (D, SJ)3
SOC 245Social Problems (D, SJ)4
SXS 110Sexuality in Society (D, SJ)3
USP 200Changing Cities (D, SJ)3
WGS 200Introduction to Women and Gender Studies (D, AERM, GP, SJ)3
WGS 210Introduction to Feminism and the State (D, SJ)3

U.S. History

AA S 210History of Asians in the United States (AERM, USH)3
AFRS 208Introduction to African American History (AERM, GP, SJ, USH)3
AIS 103Introduction to Pacific Studies (AERM, GP, SJ, USH)3
AIS 150American Indian History in the United States (AERM, SJ, USH)3
ETHS 241Health and Social Movements in the United States in the 20th Century (AERM, SJ, USH)3
HIST 120History of the U.S. through Reconstruction (USH)3
HIST 121History of the U.S. since Reconstruction (USH)3
HIST 130U.S. History for International Students (USH)3
HIST 278History of Latinos in the U.S. (AERM, SJ, USH)3
LTNS 278History of Latinos in the U.S. (AERM, SJ, USH)3
PH 241Health and Social Movements in the United States in the 20th Century (AERM, SJ, USH)3
RRS 103Introduction to Pacific Studies (AERM, GP, SJ, USH)3
RRS 240All Power to the People: Comparative Freedom Movements of the "Sixties" (AERM, SJ, USH)3
RRS 252Beyond Bars and Borders: Race and the Carceral State (AERM, USH)3
WGS 150Women and Gender in U.S. History and Society (AERM, SJ, USH)3

U.S. and California Government

AA S 213Asian Americans and American Ideals and Institutions (AERM, SJ, USG/CSLG)3
AIS 205American Indians and U.S. Laws (AERM, SJ, USG/CSLG)3
LTNS 276Latina/o, U.S. Government, and Constitutional Ideals (AERM, USG/CSLG)3
PLSI 200Introduction to American Politics (USG/CSLG)3
RRS 250Race, Ethnicity and Power in America (AERM, SJ, USG/CSLG)3
WGS 160Gender, Politics, and Citizenship (AERM, USG/CSLG)3

Abbreviations

AERM: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities
ES: Environmental Sustainability
GP: Global Perspectives
SJ: Social Justice

Area E: Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (LLD)

This requirement is designed to equip learners for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological, social, and psychological beings. Physical activity may be included if it is an integral part of the study elements described herein.

Content may include topics such as student success strategies, human behavior, sexuality, nutrition, physical and mental health, stress management, information literacy, social relationships and relationships with the environment, as well as implications of death and dying or avenues for lifelong learning. Courses in this area shall focus on the development of skills, abilities, and dispositions.

SF State Studies requirements that are met in Area E courses are indicated after the course title.

Area E: Lifelong Learning and Self-Development

A U 101First-Year Experience (E)3
AA S 106Asian American Activism (E)3
AA S 108Asian American Artistic Explorations: Creativity, Identity, and Community (E)3
AMST 200Self, Place, and Knowing: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Inquiry (E)3
BUS 216Foundations in Business Communications (E)3
CHIN 270China and the West: Cross-Cultural Encounters Through Literature and Art from Middles Ages-Present (E, GP, SJ)3
CWL 216Telling Stories: How the World Writes "You" (E, GP)3
E ED 250Teaching and Learning Beyond the Classroom (E)3
ENG 216Cultivating Curiosity: Explore Your World, Your Identity, and Your Future (E)3
ENG 217Multilingual Voices: Bridging the Distance with Our Stories (E)3
ENG 218Literature Is Not A Luxury: Writing For Self and Community (E)3
GEOG 180First-Year Experience: Sustainable City, Sustainable You (E)3
HIST 103The History of Me (E, SJ)3
HSS 210Social Justice in Action: A Health and Social Sciences Perspective (E, SJ)3
LIB 150Social Justice, Information Privilege, and You (E)3
LS 200Self, Place, and Knowing: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Inquiry (E)3
LTNS 270Latina/o/x Murals, Memes, Music, and More: Latina/o/x Arts & Humanities (E, AERM, SJ)3
MLL 150Don Quixote as Self-Made Superhero: Art and Life in an Unjust World (E)3
MSCI 200Adventures in Marine Science (E)3
SCI 101First-Year Experience in Science and Engineering (E)3
SPAN 150Don Quixote as Self-Made Superhero: Art and Life in an Unjust World (E)3
SPED 230Critical Issues in Special Education: Debunking Myths and Stereotypes (E)3

Abbreviations

AERM: American Ethnic and Racial Minorities
ES: Environmental Sustainability
GP: Global Perspectives
SJ: Social Justice

​Area F: Ethnic Studies

Given legal continuing enrollment catalog rights, transfer students starting in Fall 2022 will generally complete this requirement prior to transfer, otherwise, a 3-unit course offered by the College of Ethnic Studies will satisfy this requirement.

All first-time freshmen starting at SF State in Fall 2021 or later must take at least one 3-unit course offered by the College of Ethnic Studies.