Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

College of Health and Social Sciences

Dean: Dr. Alvin Alvarez

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Department

HSS 307
(415) 338-2030
Website: rpt.sfsu.edu
Email: rpt@sfsu.edu

Chair/Undergraduate Coordinator: Erik Rosegard
Graduate Coordinator: Jackson Wilson
IHHS Certificate Program Coordinator: Adam Burke

Institute for Holistic Health Studies

Holistic Health Studies Program
HSS 326
Phone: (415) 338-1413
Fax: (415) 338-0570
Email: ihhs@sfsu.edu
Website: sfsu.edu/~ihhs
Director: Adam Burke

Program Scope

The Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (RPT) Department at SF State, in existence since 1946, has established a reputation for excellence. From distinguished faculty with extensive experience in teaching, research, and service, to a dynamic curriculum based on comprehensive feedback from students, alumni, current trends, and an advisory board of RPT professionals, students acquire the knowledge and skills to: 

Engineer Experiences that Engage, Empower, and Educate.

One of the program’s most important resources for faculty and the curriculum is the diversity and vitality of the San Francisco Bay Area. The number of agencies, institutions, and leisure enterprises makes the region a hands-on classroom and living laboratory for public, private, and nonprofit recreation; local, state, and national parks; and domestic and international tourism.

Vision

A world where leisure permeates all facets of life. 

Mission

To advance and advocate for the field of recreation, parks, and tourism through transformative education, scholarship, and service. 

Bachelor of Science

The department offers a Bachelor of Science in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Administration, which is accredited by the National Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism (COAPRT). Accreditation provides many benefits including credibility and broader recognition within the academic and professional community. The RPT program delivers academic content that is current, relevant, and experiential. The curriculum leads to a 400-hour, 15-unit, full-time internship at one of 400+ approved RPT organizations. This culminating experience often leads to continued employment and a career in RPT.

Master of Science

The Master of Science in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism develops leaders in the RPT profession and prepares students for an advanced degree (e.g., Ph.D.). The curriculum allows students to focus on their interest area within the field. Courses are taught by RPT faculty from three different California State University campuses who have a wide range of skills, interests, and expertise. Core classes are hybrid (partially in-person and partially online), which allows for geographical freedom and meaningful face-to-face experiences. To build a cohort with strong professional and social ties, students are almost exclusively accepted in the fall semester. 

Program Competencies

The curriculum will focus on the following nine competencies, which all have assigned courses and associated program and student learning outcomes:

  • Communication (professional, nonverbal, verbal)
  • Foundations (philosophy, history, science)
  • Information Technology (application, research, reporting)
  • Leadership (ethics, intrapersonal, interpersonal)
  • Management & Administration (finance, human capital, structures)
  • Programming (design, implementation, evaluation)
  • Profession & Industry (nature & scope, standards, trends & issues)
  • Sustainability (economics, environment, equity)
  • Wellness (dimensions, application, assessment)

Students wanting to receive a Bachelor of Science in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Administration, a Minor in Recreation, or a Master of Science in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism should review the following website: rpt.sfsu.edu, then contact the Department where they will be directed to a faculty adviser related to their area of interest. Students pursuing a career in the nonprofit sector can also obtain a certificate in Youth and Human Services Nonprofit Administration. All RPT programs follow department and university policy, which include:

  • All courses used in the major, minor, or certificate programs must be completed with letter grades (CR/NC option is not allowed).
  • Courses that are required for the major, minor, or certificate programs must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 and a letter grade of C- or better [a grade of C or better is required in RPT 600GW Professionalism in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism - GWAR – the department’s Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) course].
  • Students are required to adhere to all department and university requirements stated in this Bulletin and on the department website.

Career Outlook

Every year, millions of people spend an increasing amount of time in pursuit of beneficial recreation, leisure, and touristic experiences. As the world’s leading industry, recreation and leisure/tourism spending accounts for approximately one trillion dollars per year; this equates to one-third of all consumer spending. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook published by the U.S. Department of Labor, the overall employment in the leisure/tourism and hospitality industry will grow 19% to 44% from 2010 to 2020.

There is a continued demand for full-time, trained recreation, park, and tourism professionals to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate programs and services in the public, for-profit, and nonprofit sectors within the leisure service delivery system. Thus, the recreation profession offers diverse employment opportunities for individuals who are enthusiastic, enjoy working with people, and have acquired the necessary professional skills. Although not exhaustive, the below list provides career categories within the RPT profession.

  • Campus - recreation, intramurals, wellness programs, and facilities:  Cal Recreation, SF State Mashouf Wellness Center, UCSF,  . . .
  • Corporate - employee recreation, social, incentive, and wellness programs: Apple, Google, Kaiser Permanente, Red Bull, Salesforce, . . .
  • Events - planning and producing festivals, weddings, performances, tournaments, retreats: AT&T Park, Moscone Center, Oracle Arena, . . .
  • Membership - health/social/country clubs, professional organizations, trade associations: REI, Bohemian Club, The Battery, CPRS, . . .
  • Nonprofit - after-school programs, volunteer services, social entrepreneurism: YMCA, Boys & Girls Club, Sierra Club, LYRIC, . . .
  • Outdoor - parks, summer camps, adventure outfitters, environmental centers: CA State Parks, National Park Service, Outward Bound, . . .
  • Public - every city has a community, aquatic, wellness, sport, or senior center: Oakland Recreation, SF Recreation & Park Department, . . .
  • Themed Entertainment - attractions, resorts, wineries, amusement parks: Alcatraz, Disneyland, Caymus Vineyards, de Young Museum, . . .
  • Therapeutic - improving quality of life using recreation: VA hospital, Giant Steps, Pomeroy Center, Environmental Travel Companions, . . .
  • Travel & Tourism - cruise lines, guest services, tour operators, DMCs: Altruvistas, Backroads, Carnival Cruise Line, Peek, SF Travel, . . . 

The department also offers courses that satisfy General Education (GE) requirements, and a variety of activity classes, such as sailing and rock climbing, which are open to all students. GE requirements that are satisfied by a specific course appear in that course’s description, or see the General Education section of this Bulletin for a list of all approved GE courses.

Professor

T. ADAM BURKE (2001), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.S. (1977), Michigan State University; M.P.H. (1978), University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1984), University of California, Santa Cruz; L.Ac. (1986), American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

RICHARD HARVEY (2005), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1981), University of California, Santa Cruz; M.A. (1997), San Francisco State University; Ph.D. (2005), University of California, Irvine.

PAVLINA LATKOVA (2008), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.S. (2001), California State University Sacramento; M.S. (2003), California State University Sacramento; Ph.D. (2008), Michigan State University.

ERIK PEPER (1976), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1967), Harvard University; Ph.D. (1976), Union Graduate School.

NINA ROBERTS (2005), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.S. (1983), Bridgewater State College; M.A. (1992), University of Maryland; Ph.D. (2003), Colorado State University.

ERIK J. ROSEGARD (2001), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1987), University of California, Davis; M.S. (1993), Central Washington University; Ph.D. (1997), University of Utah.

PATRICK T. TIERNEY (1991), Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.S. (1976), Northern Arizona University; M.S. (1979), Ph.D. (1991), Colorado State University.

Associate Professor

JENNIFER DAUBENMIER (2016), Associate Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1994), University of Michigan; M.A. (1997), Ph.D. (2002), University of California, Berkeley.

JACKSON WILSON (2009), Associate Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1996), University of Washington; M.A. (1999), Columbia University; Ph.D. (2009), Colorado State University.

AIKO YOSHINO (2014), Associate Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.A. (1997), Hokkaido University of Education; M.S. (2003), Ph.D. (2008), Indiana University.

Assistant Professor

PAIGE P. VIREN (2018), Assistant Professor of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism; B.S. (2001), M.S. (2003), Bowling Green State University; Ph.D. (2010), Michigan State University.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Holistic Health

HH 200 Holistic Approach to Academic Success (Units: 3)

Learn key concepts and skills for increased academic success including practices to increase mindful awareness, mental imagery for greater goal clarity, continuous improvement strategies for solving problems in school and life, and other tools for more effective study time and performance. Examine lifelong learning, personal growth, and promoting a civil society.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences
  • Environmental Sustainability

HH 205 Relaxation and Stress Reduction (Units: 3)

Research and theory in stress physiology and stress management, techniques of progressive relaxation, mental rehearsal, and imagery training including stress management strategies for coping with selected stress-related disorders with an emphasis on the relationship to physical activities.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences

HH 210 The Dao of Well-Being in Chinese Tradition (Units: 3)

Exploration of holistic and aesthetic modes of well-being from Daoist philosophical perspectives. Topics include Daoist philosophy, classical poetry, basic principles of Chinese medicine, therapeutic cuisine, traditional music, and Qigong exercises.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • C2: Humanities
  • Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities

HH 380 Holistic Health: Western Perspectives (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Exploration of Western developments in holistic health. Overview of the psychobiology of stress and self-regulatory methods such as autogenic training, biofeedback, progressive relaxation, visualization, and behavioral techniques.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science
  • Global Perspectives

HH 381 Holistic Health: Eastern Perspectives (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Eastern approaches to health and healing including acupuncture, yoga, and meditation. Comparison, scientific evaluation, and synthesis of eastern and western models of human psychology and physiology.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Global Perspectives

HH 382 Holistic Health: Human Nature and Global Perspectives (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Explore the relationship between health and ways of living through the perspective of human nature and its potential. Examine health and healing in terms of cultural traditions, evolution, the life cycle, and socio-psychological factors.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities
  • Global Perspectives

HH 383 Chinese Perspectives in Holistic Health (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Taoist philosophy of health and healing including yin-yang and five element theory, principles of qi, patterns of disharmony and health, lifestyles and environmental influences, Chinese healing modes, and self-practices.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences

HH 420 Qigong Body-Mind Energetics (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examination of the nature of qi energy, meridians, methods of activating and balancing qi, and various related body-mind energetic practices including qigong meditation, acupressure, and breath-work.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities
  • Global Perspectives

HH 430 Biofeedback: Mind-Body Connection and Self-Regulation (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

History, theory, research, physiological basis, and application of psychophysiology/biofeedback and other self-regulatory techniques. Covers wearable devices, electromyographic, thermal, respiration, electrodermal, heart rate and electroencephalographic feedback techniques, and self-practice of autogenic training. Lecture, 2 units; laboratory, 1 unit.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science

HH 435 Autogenic Training and Embodied Living (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Basic theory and technique of autogenic training, a mind-body self-care therapeutic approach with clinical and non-clinical applications. Includes stress reduction concepts, autogenic training instruction, and individual and group practice. [Formerly HH 433]

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science

HH 450 Somatics: Body Awareness, Movement, and Well-being (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examine how we perceive and experience the body in daily life, individually and collectively. The course draws on a wide range of concepts and methods to improve body awareness, deepen understanding of movement and performance, and develop a greater sense of health and well-being. Topics include history, philosophy, and somatic sensory awareness methods from a self-care education perspective.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences

HH 530 Eastern Nutrition and Herbs (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Traditional Chinese medicine's historical and philosophical perspectives on the role of nutrition and herbs in health and well-being. Topics include diet and cooking, use of herbs and food in healing, preparation and processing, and individual differences.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science
  • Global Perspectives

HH 535 Western Nutrition and Herbs (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examine the role of herbal products, nutraceuticals, supplements, and dietary choices in prevention, disease treatment, and self-care from a holistic perspective.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science
  • Environmental Sustainability

HH 540 Meditation and Imagery in Healing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Theory and methodology of major forms of meditation and imagery in promoting health and healing including examination of historical roots, mind-body mechanisms, benefits, and individual and group practice.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Global Perspectives

HH 545 Mind-Body Healing in Tibetan Culture (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Mind-body healing in Tibetan medicine and culture. Explore the theory, art, symbolic imagery, and practical techniques, such as the use of meditation in everyday life, for useful approaches to health, emotional well-being, and social harmony.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities
  • Global Perspectives

HH 560 Naturopathic Medicine and Personal Wellness (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examination of the philosophy, principles, and practice of naturopathic medicine. Prevention and treatment of disease with natural therapies are examined, including diet, botanical therapies, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, and mind-body approaches.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science

HH 650 Anthroposophical Health Studies (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Principles and practices of anthroposophical medicine and related self-care practices. Applications derived from Waldorf education, biodynamic agriculture, and eurythmy, all rooted in western thinking and evidence-based medicine are explored.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Global Perspectives

HH 660 Art as Healing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examines the value of art as a healing process. Analysis and assessment of tools and techniques used in art for healing. Students explore how artists work to heal individuals, communities, and ecosystems.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-C: Arts and/or Humanities

HH 670 Alternative Health Practices (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Overview of therapies and self-care practices in the field of integrative health and medicine. Emphasizes multidisciplinary, cross-cultural perspectives. Presentations by leading practitioners and thinkers. May be repeated for a total of 9 units.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Global Perspectives

HH 680 Holistic Health Internship Seminar (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Examination of the opportunities, strategies, and challenges of practicing and disseminating holistic health methods and perspectives.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-D: Social Sciences

HH 690 Seminar: Psychophysiology of Healing (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Explores the psychophysiology of healing. Special emphasis upon the foundation, ramifications, and practice of therapeutic touch and healee-healer interaction including the power of belief and the power of placebo. In-depth topical presentations of the healing process.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • UD-B: Physical Life Science

HH 699 Independent Study (Units: 1-3)

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and director.

Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated when the area of study is different.

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

RPT 110 Critical Thinking and the Leisure Experience (Units: 3)

Introduction to basic concepts and principles of critical thinking. Subject matter includes identifying, differentiating, constructing, and evaluating arguments; recognizing fallacies; and applying formal and informal reasoning to the leisure experience. [Formerly RPT 120]
(Note: In order for this course to satisfy General Education, students must earn a C- or CR or higher grade if taken fall 2014 or later.)

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • A3: Critical Thinking

RPT 161 Lake and Sea Kayaking (Unit: 1)

Prerequisite: Must be able to swim 25 yards.

Understanding basic theory, strokes, safety practices and skills development in lake and sea kayaking. Topics include strokes, boat handling, hazards, capsize recovery, trip planning and wildlife observation. May be repeated for 3 units for degree credit. Extra course fee may be required. (CR/NC only) [Formerly a topic under RPT 160]

RPT 162 Small Boat Sailing (Unit: 1)

Basic sailing theory, safety practices and development of skills and techniques in small boat sailing; knots, rigging, boat handling, docking and capsize recovery. Students must take a basic swim test (wearing a life jacket) prior to the first class. May be repeated for 3 units. Extra course fee may be required. (CR/NC only) [Formerly a topic under RPT 160]

RPT 163 Beginning Rock Climbing (Unit: 1)

Introduction to rock climbing and belay in both indoor and outdoor settings. Topics include knot tying, rope handling, hazards, equipment use and care, climbing techniques, anchor building, leave-no-trace climbing. Extra course fee may be required. (CR/NC only) [Formerly a topic under RPT 160]

RPT 165 Nature Sampler Field Study and Service (Unit: 1)

Immerse yourself and help nature, parks, and natural areas. Choose from a variety of volunteer projects and dates, gain hands-on experience, and learn from agency professionals. Reflect on your experiences. Activity. (CR/NC grading only) [CSL may be available] [Service hours may be used to satisfy pre-internship or degree experience requirements. Consult your department advisor.]

RPT 166 Inclusive Shared Outdoor Adventures (Unit: 1)

Introduction to inclusion principles, activities, adaptive equipment, techniques, trip planning. Collaboration of students with and without disabilities working together so all have positive shared cycling, kayaking, and sailing experiences. Specialized adaptive recreation equipment provided. Extra course fee may be required. (CR/NC only) [Formerly a topic under RPT 160]

RPT 167 Women's Backpacking (Unit: 1)

Personal adventure programming philosophy, leadership, and outdoor recreation skills for women, through readings, planning and participating in hiking and backpacking trips. Extra course fee may be required. (CR/NC only) [Formerly a topic under RPT 160]

RPT 168 Walking Tours of San Francisco (Unit: 1)

Introduction to the basics of walking tour guiding, including tour design, preparation, and presentation. Focus on design and delivery of urban walking tours in San Francisco on a topic chosen by the student. May be repeated for a total of 3 units. (CR/NC only)

RPT 169 Playing and Learning Outside the Classroom (Unit: 1)

Experience engineering, enjoyment, self-development, leadership/facilitation, benefits and barriers, environments and materials, modification and adaptation, wellness components, and other related concepts will be explored and examined through playing and facilitating experiential activities. May be repeated for a total of 3 units.

RPT 200 Foundations of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (Units: 3)

Recreation, parks, and tourism as a discipline and profession; introduction to concepts, philosophy, history, and science; nature and scope of careers in for-profit, nonprofit, and public sectors; examination of issues and trends, and their implications to leisure systems and processes.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences

RPT 205 Adventure Travel (Units: 3)

Culturally sensitive, low impact travel and tourism by individuals that engages travelers, protects the global environment and benefits local communities. Assessment of the adverse/beneficial impacts of travel. Development of trip plan incorporating adventure travel principles and sustainable tourism goals.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences

RPT 210 Growth Through Art and Leisure (Units: 3)

Arts and crafts skills for recreational and clinical and therapeutic purposes. The development of creativity and self-expression in community programs, resources for materials, leadership skills, and equipment use and maintenance are covered. Extra fee required. [Formerly RPT 330]

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • C1: Arts

RPT 220 Leisure Lifestyle Development (Units: 3)

Overview of leisure: with emphasis on how the optimal leisure experience can contribute to one's total well-being, acquiring leisure activity skills/techniques, methods of evaluating and enriching one's personal leisure. Not open to recreation majors.

RPT 230 Growth Through Adventure (Units: 3)

Development of values and an understanding of self through outdoor adventure activities. Examination of the influences of culture, history, fears, and myths on outdoor adventure activities. Introduction to selected outdoor skills. Survey of selected outdoor adventure activities in the Bay Area and Northern California.

Course Attributes:

  • C2: Humanities
  • C3 or C2: Humanities/Lit.

RPT 240 Leisure and Society (Units: 3)

A critical behavioral and social analysis of recreation, parks, tourism, and related professions and disciplines. Introduction to theory, history, literature, and careers in the field. Examination of leisure trends and issues, and their implications to the leisure service delivery system.

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences

RPT 280 Developmental Play Processes (Units: 3)

Concepts, trends, and issues related to play, recreation, and leisure including learning and human development throughout the lifespan, gender and cultural differences, materials and environments, benefits and barriers, engineering and facilitating play experiences, and activity adaptation. [Formerly RTP 380]

Course Attributes:

  • E1 LLD Pre-Fall 2019
  • D1: Social Sciences

RPT 300 Leadership in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently).

Leadership theory, self-assessment, intrapersonal and interpersonal communication, and group dynamics in recreation, parks, and tourism settings. Develop leadership competencies in cultural sensitivity, planning, safety/risk management, and problem-solving through experiential learning, influence of power and ethics on decision-making.

RPT 325 Information Technology in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently).

Knowledge and skill development in information technology and literacy; introduction to APA writing style, research, data collection, analysis, and reporting; and application of word processing, presentation, spreadsheet, and specialized software used in the recreation, parks, and tourism profession. [Formerly RPT 225]

RPT 340 Conference, Event Planning, and Management (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing; RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently); or consent of the instructor.

Organizing, planning, and managing conferences, conventions, and special events: site and faculty selection, scheduling, programming and theme development, exhibit management, registration, and overall meeting services.

RPT 350 Facilitating Wellness Through Leisure (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently).

Examination of concepts, processes, and applications related to leisure and wellness. Origin, development, and expression of leisure in individual behavior and its relationship to facilitating wellness. [Formerly RPT 650] [CSL may be available]

RPT 358 Campus Recreation (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of the instructor.

Introduction to campus recreation with a focus on student development, leadership, and the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association's (NIRSA) core competencies (programming; facility design; human resources; legal, liability, and risk management; research and evaluation; strategic, fiscal, and operational management; philosophy and theory).

RPT 360 Outdoor Recreation Leadership (Unit: 1)

Prerequisites: RPT 400 and consent of instructor.

Advanced students serve under individual faculty supervision in organizing and conducting outdoor recreation programs. Open only to majors and minors in recreation. May be repeated twice on advisement.

RPT 370 Principles of Nonprofit Administration (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of the instructor.

Principles of nonprofit agency administration. Understanding of philosophical, historical, and social context; volunteer movement, funding, governance, organization, and management of nonprofit agencies; trends; professional development and employment opportunities.

RPT 390 Leisure Travel and Tourism (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to upper-division standing; RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently); or consent of the instructor.

Investigate scope and nature of the tourism industry including key system components; history; group travel planning, budgeting, and marketing techniques and processes used by tourism professionals; careers; current trends; and future challenges and opportunities.

Course Attributes:

  • Global Perspectives

RPT 400 Programming Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Experiences (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; RPT 200, RPT 325; concurrent enrollment in RPT 500 recommended.

Participate in, volunteer for, and facilitate a leisure experience. Learn the who, what, when, where, how, and why of a recreation, parks, and/or tourism experience, and generate a needs assessment, asset map, budget, marketing strategy, risk management procedure, and other planning, implementation, and evaluation components of

RPT 410 Therapeutic and Inclusive Recreation (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently); or consent of the instructor.

Universal access, design, and inclusion in a diverse range of recreation, parks, and tourism settings. Disabling conditions and implications for leadership, activity adaptation, and programming. Enabling legislation, regulatory agents, and practices relevant to inclusivity and human rights. [CSL may be available]

Course Attributes:

  • Social Justice

RPT 430 Ecology of Outdoor Recreation (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Parks and outdoor recreation. Conservation of resources, appreciation, use and misuse of the natural environment.

RPT 440 Urban Recreation and Parks (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to upper-division standing; GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better; RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently); or consent of the instructor.

Urban recreation needs, issues, services; socio-political, ethnographic, and demographic influences on recreation, parks, and human service organizations for youth and other populations across the lifespan. Understanding philosophical, historical, and contemporary volunteerism, basic nonprofit governance, resource distribution, and managing municipal services.

Course Attributes:

  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Am. Ethnic & Racial Minorities
  • Social Justice

RPT 445 Recreation Therapy and the Expressive Arts (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of the instructor.

Expressive arts and their use in a therapeutic recreation setting: art, music, movement and dance, poetry, and drama therapy.

RPT 460 Recreation Destination Resorts (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 390 or consent of the instructor.

Leisure experiences provided by resorts, theme parks, campgrounds, hotels, and activity specific centers. Fundamentals of establishing, administrating, promoting, and working in recreation resorts.

RPT 470 Travel with Purpose (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Restricted to upper-division standing.

Introduction and application of concepts related to socially responsible travel, community engagement, cultural competency, and sociocultural, environmental, and economic sustainability through a mandatory 40-hour service learning experience. Lecture, 2 units; activity, 1 unit. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. Travel outside California or the U.S. may be required. Extra fee required. [CSL may be available]

RPT 500 Organization and Administration of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; RPT 200 and RPT 325; concurrent enrollment in RPT 400 recommended.

Principles and practices in organizational structure, human resources administration, supervision, budgeting and financial management, and analysis of recreation, parks, and tourism organizations. Trends, technology applications, and case studies.

RPT 520 Parks and Outdoor Recreation Resources (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; RPT 200 (may be taken concurrently); or consent of the instructor.

Park operations and regulatory compliance at municipal, county, state, and federal levels; resource acquisition and financing; facility planning, design, and maintenance; environmental issues; ethics; the interrelationship between environment and visitor experience; and risk management.

Course Attributes:

  • Environmental Sustainability

RPT 570 Developing and Managing Resources in Nonprofit Agencies (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 370 or consent of the instructor.

Framework for the administration of nonprofit agencies through volunteer recruitment, selection, and management. Principles of philanthropy and fundraising applied to the management of nonprofit agencies. [CSL may be available]

RPT 600GW Professionalism in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism - GWAR (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Restricted to upper-division standing; GE Area A2; RPT 200, RPT 300, RPT 325, and RPT 350; concurrent enrollment in RPT 400; RPT 500 recommended; internship eligibility.

Seminar in professional/personal development, career planning, internship preparation, and current issues, trends, policies, and professional practices. Demonstration of professional, nonverbal and verbal communication competencies. (ABC/NC grading only) [Formerly RPT 660GW]

Course Attributes:

  • Graduation Writing Assessment

RPT 605 Ecotourism Principles and Practices (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: GE Areas A1*, A2*, A3*, and B4* all with grades of C- or better or consent of the instructor.

Nature-based, low-impact tourism to preserve the environment and local communities. Assessment of adverse and beneficial tourism impacts on the global environment, indigenous cultures, and economy. Ecotourism market, providers, eco-resorts, community settings, and regulators. The balance between promoting versus limiting ecotourism.

Course Attributes:

  • UD-D: Social Sciences
  • Environmental Sustainability
  • Global Perspectives
  • Social Justice

RPT 640 Recreational Use of National Parks and Protected Areas (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of the instructor.

Introduction to concepts of conservation and preservation of national parks and other ecosystem units, and managing visitor use. Emphasis on history, management principles, and current issues. National parks will be the primary focus and selected international protected areas will be included. [CSL may be available]
(This course is offered as RPT 640 and ENVS 640. Students may not repeat the course under an alternate prefix.)

RPT 670 Advanced Conference, Event Planning, and Management (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: RPT 340 or consent of the instructor.

Application of advanced techniques for planning and managing conventions, trade shows, festivals, expositions, and other special events. Event strategic planning and marketing, ROI, and risk management.

RPT 690 Internship in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism (Units: 12)

Prerequisites: Restricted to upper-division Recreation, Parks, and Tourism majors; internship eligibility; and consent of the instructor.

A 400-hour, full-time internship in a recreation, parks, or tourism agency supervised by qualified personnel. Application of concepts, principles, and best practices. Directed field experience and training in organization and industry infrastructure including operations, facilities, marketing, finance, and programs/services. Demonstration of competencies needed in the profession. (Plus-minus ABC/NC) [CSL may be available]

RPT 699 Independent Study (Units: 1-3)

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or consent of the instructor. Enrollment by petition.

In-depth, individual, or group study projects in areas of personal and professional recreation and leisure interest under the guidance of a faculty member. May be repeated for a total of 6 units. (Plus-minus letter grade only) [CSL may be available]

RPT 700 Orientation and Professional Development in Recreation and Leisure Service (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.

Orientation to the recreation, parks, and tourism discipline; literature in the field; research writing; current issues and trends; comprehensive self-assessment professional skills and competencies.

RPT 720 Developing Collaborative Leaders in Leisure Services (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor.

Examination and development of leadership behaviors and principles associated with creating and/or guiding a leisure service organization's efforts to develop collaborative leaders. Emphasis on creating an organizational environment with a diverse workforce where shared leadership is valued and practiced.

RPT 810 Research Methods in Recreation and Leisure Studies (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: RPT 700 or consent of the instructor.

Introduction to general research approaches, design, and methodology, with emphasis on research design and methods used in recreation and leisure studies. Review of pertinent literature. Gain practical experience with graduate level resources at SF State.

RPT 890 Internship (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Field experience in recreation in a medical, paramedical, or institutional setting under the supervision of specialists in recreation.

RPT 895 Applied Research Project (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

An in-depth examination of an issue/problem within recreation, parks, and/or tourism. Supervised by committee chair and culminates in an applied research project and professional paper. (CR/NR grading; RP allowed)

RPT 898 Master's Thesis (Units: 3)

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and approval of Advancement to Candidacy (ATC) and Culminating Experience (CE) forms by Graduate Studies.

Research on a topic within recreation, parks, and/or tourism resulting in a significant literature review, methodology, and data analysis. Supervised by committee chair and culminates in a thesis. (CR/NC grading only)

RPT 899 Independent Study (Units: 3)

Prerequisite: Consent of the graduate coordinator and supervising faculty member.

Study is planned, developed, and completed under the direction of a member of the college. Open only to graduate students of demonstrated ability to do independent work. Enrollment by petition. May be repeated for a total of 6 units.